DATE BREAKDOWN: Throwing Stuff – “Stuff We’ve Thrown”

File Under: Hardcore Punk, Punk

In the spirit of the ever approaching Valentine’s Day, my ears decided it may be a good idea to finally follow through with their commitment to Stuff We’ve Thrown. It’s been (a few?) months in the making, but Throwing Stuff has been loosely thrown into my ears’ listening rotation since announced as Date 23 and they’re ready for analysis. 

Initially it was clear Throwing Stuff and my ears would get along. Fifteen years of listening to almost exclusively punk will form a kinship with almost any punk band except for Dr. Manhattan. And it appeared that’s all it was going to be. Stuff We’ve Thrown doesn’t break any mold or cover new territory. If you’re expecting convention shattering punk you’re not going to find it here. But while I’ve been searching frantically for who the lead vocalist reminds me of, with the name constantly on the tip of my tongue, in two plus months such name has not manifested itself. Maybe it will come to me still, but after this long of a wait I’m starting to think that Throwing Stuff are one of those bands that sound so reminiscent of everything yet are a unique entity in their own right. You’ll encounter this phenomenon in all forms of art, something so familiar and comforting that you feel like it must be ripping something else off, but you can never tell what. The reason? It does what it does with such ease that you can’t help but think it’s a copy, while in reality they’re just being true to themselves. That’s what you get with Throwing Stuff: a band that knows what they’re here to do, and they’re here to throw stuff.

So what does it sound like? British hardcore with a bounce. It’s angry, but it’s fun as hell. Fun would actually be my main takeaway from the album and what sets it apart the most from its contemporaries. They don’t take themselves seriously, they sing about hating the daily grind, enjoying what you have in life, and of course, throwing stuff. The guitar parts are usually quite simplistic, fast bursts of fury, but show more control in tracks like “Token Beef“. The drums take a larger role, almost at center stage for most of the albums duration, the primary driving force behind the majority of songs. It doesn’t hurt the album’s feel that the drum attacks are heavy, especially for a band named Throwing Stuff. Oh yeah, and the lyrics have an anthemic quality most of the time, demanding you shout along at full force. Just listen to the band’s take on “Big Yellow Taxi,” and try not to have a smile on your face.

So what if they don’t break the mold? They don’t need to. “The chances of anything coming from us are a million to one they said,” the band bellows over and over again on “Throwing Shapes“. But, the funny thing is, while maybe not reinventing the wheel, they definitely reinvented how to have fun with the wheel they already had. 

Bad metaphor. I’m done. Happy Valentine’s Day.

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Highlights include: Throwing Shapes,” “Big Yellow Taxi,” and “Steve’s Job”

You can listen to Stuff We’ve Thrown here.

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Going on a blind date with Stuff We’ve Thrown:

3.5/5 stars

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Week #23: Throwing Stuff – “Stuff We’ve Thrown”

The next installment of my ears going on a candlelit dinner with sounds they’ve never heard is upon them. This week, they will sit down with an album called Stuff We’ve Thrown by a band called Throwing Stuff. You can listen along and name your price HERE.


What does it sound like? I’m about to find out. Come on and join me. 

Date Breakdown forthcoming. Holidays. Be patient. I dunno. It’ll happen.

DATE BREAKDOWN: Dia – “Tiny Ocean” EP

File Under: Experimental Indie, Pop Adjacent

Greeted with a little more information than desired when going into a musical blind date, I knew that Tiny Ocean would be “experimental indie,” not to mention quality enough to be “produced by Joey Waronker of Beck, Atoms for Peace fame.” Those quotes are straight from the emailed request I received, and although going against my policy of knowing nothing about the date I’m about to embark on, I was so fucking flattered anyone gives a shit enough to email me a request, that again, I let it slide. [Is that the right number of commas? I gotta go back to school, man.] Besides, I know jack shit about who Joey Waronker is, and my only real knowledge of Beck is that Lance Hahn (see: the fucking greatest, may he rest in peace) played guitar for him on occasion. So I guess nothing was really spoiled and I should stop being all butt hurt about arbitrary rules that last time I checked I made up. Yeah, checked again, I made that shit up. So I digress…

Dia, aka Danielle Birrittella, is clearly an accomplished opera singer. Her technique I’m assuming is flawless, but not having a shred of knowledge on the subject other than what does and doesn’t make me wince, I’m just going to go ahead and say 100%, fact checked, yes, flawless technique. The most similar sounding artist I listen to of my own volition from time to time would probably be Sara Bareilles, but that comparison isn’t exactly fitting. There’s an unsettling tone underneath Dia’s beautiful vocals, something dark, and in its own way also beautiful that exists outside of the Bareillesphere. In fact, the impending dread slowly creeps in from the subconscious of Tiny Ocean, showing itself the most with the mesmerizing  closer “Big Man.” It’s in Dia’s superbly finessed layering of sounds that the tide of this tiny ocean comes rolling in, washing away any and all distractions. Like an intimate, almost inviting wall of sound, these six songs transcend the human experience and leave me completely and utterly relaxed.

I’m not sure what else I could say to better serve these recordings, so I’m going to suggest that you dip your ears into the Tiny Ocean if you haven’t already, but more importantly that you really sink yourself in.

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Highlights Include: “Covered In Light,” “Tiny Ocean,” and “Gambling Man

You can stream Tiny Ocean HERE.

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Going on a blind date with Tiny Ocean:

4.75/5 stars

DATE BREAKDOWN: Love Ghost

File Under: Grunge, Adult Alternative

Okay, so yes, I am two days late on this review. Real Bush League journalism over here. Is this even journalism? Do people still say Bush League? Yes.

As I stated in my previous post, I normally don’t just review songs free-floating in the digital ether, I prefer to discuss a band’s work under the guise of a cohesive album or EP. However, with Love Ghost I am simply doing the former due to an absence of the latter.


Love Ghost is a Los Angeles based band made up of 13-19 year old members, but you wouldn’t be able to tell just by listening to their songs. In fact, they sound more along the lines of Adult Alternative, especially on “Friday Afternoon,” a grunge song that could easily hit the satellite-radio era airwaves. The vocals sound quite mature and the instrumentation is executed with precision. “Forgive Me” adds a bit more emotion and exceptional viola skills, all with a youthier angst, but still falls in line with that Adult Contemporary Radio sound. “Mystery Box*” feels like a cover, but I haven’t found any evidence to that effect aside from the asterisk in the title that seemingly leads nowhere. It’s not a bad song, it just feels less connected to their sound. Here we ramp up the emo-sphere again, while gradually building urgency and vulnerability. Perhaps the only sign of their age lies in the vocals of “Mystery Box*” where the lyrics carry more life experience than the voice belting them into the world.

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Going on a blind date with the songs of Love Ghost:

3.75/5 stars